Posts Tagged: "Dave Clarke"

AROUND TOWN – Then Play On

Then Play On By Dave Clarke - - Music & Food
The London Yodeller


The Northern Pikes - Home County Music & Arts Festival - 
July 16th

 

Saskatoon Saskatchewan’ s Northern Pikes had already released two indie eps before signing with Virgin Records and releasing their debut album, Big Blue Sky, in 1987, that contained their first single, the post punk track, Teenland. They opted for a more rootsy sound on its follow-up, 1988’s Secrets of the Alibi, which included singles Let’s Pretend, Wait for Me and Hopes Go Astray and set the stage for their biggest album, Snow in June and a top ten single, She Ain’t Pretty, with a heavily rotated video that earned them one of their five Juno nominations. The band called it quits after the release of their fourth album Neptune in 1993, but were coaxed back into performing for the release of their greatest hits album in 1999. They have continued to record independently, preferring a more casual schedule and avoiding the pressure of answering to a big record label.

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AROUND TOWN: London Rock N’ Roll Walking Tour

Dave Clarke - - Music & Food
The London Yodeller

The London Rock n’ Roll Walking Tour

Saturday, April 30th

Get some exercise and learn all the poop about London’s 70’s and 80’s music and arts scene as Paul Wootton Harlow, a veteran of the scene as a member of The Sinners, Spiral Scratch and the Crawlin’ Kingsnakes, takes you on a Rock n’ Roll Walking tour of downtown London. There will be lots of cool stories, gossip and remembrances of the clubs and the incidents that shaped a vibrant underground arts scene. This unique adventure takes place on Saturday April 30th at 1 pm. Tickets are $25 and you can pick them up and get more info at Grooves Records.

SHORTLISTED: Five Great Music Magazines

Dave Clarke - - Music & Food
The London Yodeller

1. Dig 1955-1968?CLARKE shortlisted DIG music mags

Cited as the first teen magazine, Dig besides covering music, features other teen interests like movie and TV celebrities, clothes and dating. My 1960 issue has a dreamy picture of Leave It To Beaver’s Tony Dow on the cover and the accompanying article is entitled “15 Is a Goofy Age”. Dig also asks questions like “Are All Athletes Creeps?” and has a music column called Rhythm and News that asks, “How Now Elvis?” But my favourite part is their pen pals (remember them?) pages Paper Mates. I won’t be writing David Giuffre from Manhattan Beach, California who proudly declares, “I hate rock and roll . . . does anyone agree with me by any chance?”

2. Rolling Stone 1967-today

A true innovator in music magazines, originally published every two weeks on newsprint giving it a great immediacy and treating music seriously, covering political matters and including great investigative reporting. Fantastic hip writers flocked to the magazine, including Hunter S. Thompson, whose Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas was first serialized in the magazine. Still going under the leadership of founder Jann Wenner, like the hippies that became yuppies, the magazine has become fairly mainstream, and a great repository for Calvin Klein ads.

3. Creem 1969- 1989

Creem was true rock n roll, published out of Detroit , and edited by one of the greatest music writers of all time, Lester Bangs, as well as featuring other great music writers like Robert Christgau and Dave Marsh. Each issue also included, as a tongue and cheek homage to teen magazines, a celebrity pin up (Creem Mate of the Month, Creem Dream or Creem Profile) that also featured their fictional Boy Howdy beer. Continue Reading

LOST CLASSIC: Todd Rundgren & Utopia, Deface the Music (Bearsville 1980)

Dave Clarke - - Music & Food
The London Yodeller

After the debacle of the Buggs’ Beatles story is this loving tribute to the Beatles put out by power pop superstar and gifted producer, Todd CLARKE lost classic deface the musicRundgren, and his prog rock outfit Utopia. The 13 songs on this album pay homage to the fab four, capturing the sounds of all the phases of their musical career. Rundgren had already shown an incredible talent for mimicry on his previous album Faithful which included one whole side of exact copies of tunes by The Yardbirds, Beach Boys and The Beatles. What makes this album special is that instead of parody (done so well by The Rutles two years earlier) is that the Utopia tunes capture the spirit of the Beatles tunes without being outright imitations.

The opener I Just Want to Touch You has the feel of She Loves You and I Want to Hold Your Hand but also captures the general Merseybeat sound as well. Todd does a pretty good Paul McCartney vocal and on the tracks Alone, Life Goes On and All Smiles this is put to good use on songs that sound-check McCartney-sung tunes like Eleanor Rigby, Fool on the Hill  and Michelle. Nice little musical touches prevail like the variation on Day Tripper’s opening riff on That’s Not Right, or Hoi Poloi, which combines the satire of George Harrison’s Piggies and then throws in a little Penny Lane horn riff, for good measure. The album concludes with the Beatles psychedelic phase with the track Everybody Else Is Wrong, which forgoes the lyrical psychedelic imagery but still may remind you of I’m the Walrus.

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MONDO PHONO: The Buggs,The Beetle Beat (Coronet Records 1964)

Dave Clarke - - Music & Food
The London Yodeller

CLARKE mondo phono bugged out on the beatles It was inevitable that with the crazy success of the Beatles and Beatlemania in general that enterprising labels would try to cash in and perhaps dupe a few customers with releases like The Beat Boys’ Beatlemania or The Beats’ The Merseyside Sound.  One of the most interesting cash-ins was the Buggs’ The Beetle Beat, touted on the cover as “The Original Liverpool Sound” . . .  “Recorded in England”. Not quite true, as the Buggs were actually a Bergenfield, New Jersey band called the Coachman V and the album was recorded in New York City. The band was convinced that the album which included two Beatle tunes, I Want to Hold Your Hand and She Loves You and a bunch of Brit-sounding originals like Mersey Mercy and Teddy Boy Stomp, was to be released under their Coachmen V name. To add insult to injury, the moody “Beatlemania” style cover featured models, not the band members, and the band never received any royalties at all from the recordings even though Coronet would re-release the album in 1966 under the title Boots a Go Go and tracks from the album would show up on a bunch of the label’s compilations as well. Not totally discouraged by the experience was the Coachmen V’s keyboard player, Gary Wright, who would go on to join Spooky Tooth and enjoyed a solo career with the mega hit Dreamweaver.

SHORTLISTED: Five Answer Songs

Dave Clarke - - Music & Food
The London Yodeller

This was a predominately 60’s phenomenon, where a song was recorded and released to give the other side of the story of an established hit song, most of the time using the same tune as the original.

1. Damita Jo I’ll Save the Last Dance for You - reply song to the Drifters’ hit Save the Last Dance for Me

Pretty simple stuff this one as Damita promises that she’s going to hoof that last dance and whatever follows with our protagonist. Actress/singer Damita Jo recorded another answer song, once again proving her loyalty, with I’ll Be There - a reply to Ben E. King’s Stand by Me.

Dave Clarke shortlisted 1 2. Jody Miller Queen of the House - reply song to Roger Miller’s King of the Road

This was one of the few answer songs to become a hit, making it to #12 on the charts. The perky Ms. Miller sings about the trials and tribulations of domestic engineering, making it sound as wonderful as Roger Miller made being a hobo sound. There’s a sexy Scopitone video for this one you can check out on YouTube.

3. Jeanne Black He’ll Have to Stay - reply song to Jim Reeves’ He’ll Have to Go Continue Reading

MONDO PHONO: The Black Diamonds, A Tribute to Jimi Hendrix (Alshire Records)

Dave Clarke - - Music & Food
The London Yodeller

Dave Clarke Mondo PhonoAlshire Records, the home of countless 101 Strings albums, would sometimes venture into the world of rock music with their Pop series, with albums by The Animated Egg and the California Poppy Pickers, non-existent bands formulated in the studio as low budget cash-in records. One of the most blatant examples is the Black Diamonds Tribute to Jimi Hendrix album.

Alshire cheaped out and instead of paying publishing royalties for actual Hendrix tunes, they filled the record with somewhat Hendrix titles like Hazy Color (for Purple Haze), Flame (Fire), Lady Wolf (Foxy Lady), Experienced You (Are You Experienced?), Hey Horse (Hey Joe) and Burp Gun (Machine Gun). That being said, the record does have, a sort of cool cheese factor for fans of somewhat psychedelic instrumentals. But the chicanery continues as the label would often recycle tunes from their other efforts by just changing the title. Continue Reading

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