Posts Tagged: "Letters to the Editor"

Letters to the Editor for September 8th, 2016

- - Everything Else
The London Yodeller

CURNOES ON CURNOE

[Re: GREG CURNOE: Taking a Stand in London, Yodeller Feature, Aug. 11, Herman Goodden] This is a fine article, especially your kind remarks about my book. I do not especially like my writing style described as banal when I was simply trying for plain and unadorned. However, your comments and Sheila’s are appreciated since my book is usually left off Greg bibliographies and articles. [Publisher] WIn Schell would certainly have been pleased as well. (Hey, that rhymes) Concerning religion, you could say that while Greg was not interested in religion he was certainly a highly spiritual person. I make this distinction for myself also. Looking forward to reading the whole book. – Regards, Lynda Curnoe

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Brexit Et Cetera

Letters to the Editor - - Art & Books, Everything Else, News & Politics
The London Yodeller

THANKS FOR THE LITERARY HEADS UP

[Re: The Man Who Understood Dickens, Hermaneutics, June 23, Herman Goodden] Thanks so much for your recent article on G.K. Chesterton. I keep returning to Dickens over the years – so have added the Chesterton book to “my list”. Oddly the book seems to go by two title variations: Appreciations and Criticisms and Criticisms and Appreciations. – A London reader, Michael Brunet

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Letters to the Editor

- - Everything Else
The London Yodeller

Letters to the EditorWHY PEOPLE LISTEN TO A BLOWHARD LIKE DONALD TRUMP 

[Re: Donald Trump: We’ve Seen All This Before, Pegg’s World, Mar. 17, Robert Pegg] Here is why liberalism must be stopped. Man boy Trudeau has ensured liberal power for decades after bribing natives, ‘Quebecers’, enviros, women, teachers and E.I. recipients with cash and benefits and for the crime of giving homes to Syria’s homeless instead of Canada’s 300,000 homeless. Bring on the revolution. What side are you on?  – Zosha123

I never want to be on the wrong side in history where it’s proven to be the side that’s pointing fingers and screaming “YOU CANT SAY THAT!” And don’t forget it’s you progressives that are saying that crash and burn is unavoidable so why are you not listening? Remember when being inclusive, open-minded and tolerant of opposing views was progressive? And what does today’s regressive / progressive liberal call any opposing view? Racist. The tables are turned now and it’s you libs that are the dysfunctional power that we must be fighting. You wanted a revolution, well it’s here. Down with liberal bullies!  – mememine

DO YOU SEE WHAT I SEE?

[Re: Matthew Trueman’s Dirt: Nature, Technology and other Imagined Comforts, Look at This, Mar. 3, Moira McKee] In regard to the insightful art review by Ms. Moira McKee concerning Westland Gallery’s Matthew Trueman exhibit of detailed woodcuts – which unfortunately has expired. When a novice female reviewer sees genitals in artwork . . . men pay attention! I had to check this out for myself. What I believe the observant Ms. McKee may have perceived in the projected skyward hill of dirt and the mated large low valley woodcut would properly be described as classic archetypal phallic symbolism. Perhaps next time she could simply refer to it with this term.  – Albert Berklowsky, Art Critic

YOU’VE GOT TO BE KIDDING

[Re: Canadian Security Asleep at the Wheel, Laying Down the Lawton, March 17, Andrew Lawton] If you want people to take The Yodeller seriously, you need to publish better work than this. I hope for your sake this article isn’t representative of the overall quality of the publication.  – Scott Holden Continue Reading

Letters to the Editor

- - Everything Else
The London Yodeller

Letters to the EditorWHERE DID YODELLER REVIEWER GET SUCH A WACKY IDEA?

[Re: Immigrants’ experiences in their own images and words, Gallery Review, March 17, Herman Goodden] In your March 17 article about Rosemary Sloot’s 2012 exhibit Immigrant you refer to the current exhibit, Home and Away, running at Fringe Gallery, and as producers of this exhibit we would like to clarify a few points. To start, Rosemary Sloot did not jury the fifty pieces that comprise the show. This exhibit welcomed any and all artists, and no artists were turned away. Part of the reason for our successful CAIP II grant from London Arts Council was our intention to support all artists in the city by providing a forum for them to showcase their work. 

Your comment about the “rambunctious and uneven” nature of this exhibit suggests that you may have misunderstood the central and essential idea behind the show. Each entry was a “package”, describing in word and visual art, the immigrant experience in a personal and intimate way, and thus, the quality of the work is irrelevant. We invite you to take more time with the exhibit and read the stories that its participants have told. We believe there is unlimited potential for this show to evoke inspiration for further works of visual art, performance, music and writing, and we encourage you to reflect upon this exhibit with those possibilities in mind. Home and Away runs until March 31, 2016.Sincerely, Diane McClure and Franca Smith, Co-Producers of Home and Away

[Here at The Yodeller, we don’t make a habit of answering letters to the editor but you folks are clearly messing with my head. On page 6 of the brochure for Home and Away you identify Rosemary Sloot as “Guest Artist, Juror”. On page 12 headed, “Thank You!” you lead with: “Our first thank you goes to Rosemary Sloot for germinating the seed of inspiration for Home and Away. She was behind this project from the very first, and brought it full circle when she agreed to judge the show.Then at the top of the Acknowledgements page of the 100 page book, Home and Away, which the two of you put together with Eleanor Ovtscherenkoyou and which I read in its entirety, you write that Sloot “also graciously agreed to jury the art exhibit.” So if this reviewer was suffering under some sort of misconception about Rosemary Sloot’s role here, you’re the ones who planted it. And regardless of who did or didn’t act as juror, congratulations on a moving and thought-provoking exhibition and book. HG]

YOU DON’T HAVE TO MAKE THE DRIVE TO SIMCOE

[Re: Cheesy Quotes, Theoretical Physics, Four Brothers and a Cow, The Pursuit of Happiness, March 17, Jeffrey Schiller] Morgan here, yet another VG Family member. I am married to fourth born Kevin and I run the marketing and creative for VG Meats. Thanks for the great article and the kind words. A really refreshing approach to your writing. I’m not sure if you are aware but we have a monthly meat drop there in London so you can make the journey even shorter should you choose. Our drop is part of our Farm to City program where we skip the middleman – the big grocery chains. Hopefully the French’s thing will open some consumers’ eyes to the struggles of small businesses with these giants. We bring our meat directly from our store to a driveway near you. We have hosts in three cities now who lend out their driveways to us once a month to park our freezer van and distribute the meat that people order from our e-commerce site.  You can check it out at vgfarmtocity.ca. Our next drop in London is April 11th at 7:30pm. The location is 39 Scottsdale St. in Lambeth – actually my parents’ home. Thanks for supporting local food and happy MEATing. - Morgan Van Groningen

SOMETIMES LIFE IS EDGY ENOUGH, THANKS

[Re: Edgy as a Beach Ball, Riplash, Mar. 3, Jason Rip] First of all, what is “edgy”? The harsher aspects of life would hardly be considered to be “entertaining” by those living through them. Is theatre meant to be educational, political, entertaining . . . or a combination? Why shouldn’t the largest theatres in this community be a safe, numbing space? What if the “real world” is frightening, stressful and mind-numbingly grinding? What if theatre is escapism? The movies enjoyed a golden age during the Great Depression, because it was a place to go to forget. You may like to eat meat, but for some people, daily living is soul-crushing. The theatre may be the one and only place where dreams do come true . . . and the good guy wins . . . and justice is served . . . and babies aren’t abandoned, and young people aren’t sold into sex slavery, politicians aren’t criminals and climate change isn’t going to end the world. Because if you want edgy, watch the news. What if there is a place . . . a need? For healthy, beautiful young people to tap-tap-tap their hearts out on a stage . . . for an audience who desperately, for two hours, NEEDS to not process anymore agony.
[You write:] “Time to address the notion that edgy does not sell. Of course, there’s some truth to it, partly due to the fact that there are huge segments of society that do not go to the theatre at all. “

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Letters to the Editor

- - Everything Else
The London Yodeller

LettersEditorwebEXAGGERATED RUMOURS OF NUDITY

[Re: LONDON THEATRE Edgy as a Beach Ball, Riplash, Mar. 3, Jason Rip] I have to correct Jason on his information. The “all-nude show” that didn’t make the cut for the 2016 London Fringe was in fact two short plays: Tom Swimm’s Just a Little More Blue and Johnna Adams’ Nude in the Dark. I know because I’m the one who submitted them. The first play has three characters and one is clothed for the first half. In the second play, the four characters don’t remove their clothes until the end. Jason is right about one thing: “through the grapevine” is an accurate description of the quality of communication in this theatre community. - Dan Ebbs

BOTH SIDES OF POLITICAL SPECTRUM DESERVE REJECTION

[Re: The Right-Wing Drift from Sunny to Scared, Commentary, Mar. 3, Jeff Culbert] Harpercon gave us increased tax subsidies for single mothers, took the tax off of Tampons and actually did table climate blame legislation. Could he be any more socialist? We need to unite against both ideologies - the socialist one based on herd mentality and the other which is just a religion wearing a political mask.mememine Continue Reading

Letters to the Editor

- - Everything Else
The London Yodeller

COVER TO COVERLettersEditorweb

I don’t know how you do it, but you have yet to disappoint me with your cover art choice. Keep it up!Ginette Bisaillon

EMILY POST BEGS YOUR PARDON

[Re: The Charter of Rights & Freedom & Etiquette, Letter to the Editor, Feb. 18, Mohamed Hammoud] Mr. Hammoud, in protesting to the long suffering Emily Post that wearing the niqab, the burka and other dress is perfectly legal at a citizenship ceremony or anywhere else, you demonstrate that you completely missed the point. Ms. Post started from the premise that such garb has been validated by Canadian law. What is at issue is the discourtesy involved in depriving others of the aids to communication which come with speaking face to face.Yours ethereally, Emily Post

SOME SUGGESTED READING FOR YODELLERS

I was just thinking that your paper should review a book that was written back in 2009, Reflections on the Revolution in Europe, by Christopher Caldwell. It dealt primarily with immigration to Europe and beyond after World War II and is applicable to what is currently happening to the West. Thanks very much. Your paper is appreciated, especially in the London market. – Tony Mangano

CONNOISSEURS OF FINE DINING ARE AGREED

[Re: In Praise of the Great Canadian Grilled Cheese Sandwich, Yodelling in the Canyon, Feb. 4, Barry Wells] In my grade eight elective home economics class our first challenge was the grilled cheese sandwich. I didn’t bother telling the instructor that I had mastered it years earlier. Oh yea, the diagonal cut is necessary. By its absence I did notice Velveeta cheese jumping out at me . . . that was my choice in my younger years. – Marty Godfrey

DON’T UNDERESTIMATE THE SIGNIFICANCE OF BRICKS AND MORTAR

[Re: The Heart of London, Forest City Folk, Feb. 4, Menno Meijer] It was stated in the article that bricks and mortar do not make a city; the interaction between people are the essence of what makes a city, but I think that is a bit of a stretch. I fondly remember the bricks and mortar places listed in the article and I believe that the interaction of people together with the bricks and mortar places are what makes a city; it is a symbiotic relationship. People roaming around with nowhere to go, no venues to attend, no merrymaking or traditional memories to create, would not a city make.  Continue Reading

Letters to the Editor

- - Everything Else
The London Yodeller

Letters to the EditorUMBRAGE TAKEN AT ECONOMIST’S VIEWS

[Re: Who Pays for Plays? An Economist Takes on the Arts, Riplash, Jan. 21, Jason Rip] Rubbish. Perhaps “theatre people” know all they need to know about economics, our capitalist religion, our modern version of astrology. Only an egotistical economist would assume that critics disagree because they aren’t informed enough or intelligent enough to understand his esoteric subject. Many understand and see how insanely frivolous it really is. – John E. Turner

BECAUSE ONLY ARTS GROUPS GET SUBSIDIES, RIGHT?

[Re: Who Pays for Plays? An Economist Takes on the Arts, Riplash, Jan. 21, Jason Rip] So, there are no mainstream industries that get government subsidies? I think John Palmer’s assumption that business people are immune to the sort of ‘entitlement mindset’ of which he accuses theatre people of being guilty is hysterical. Bankers, for instance? At the heart of a GLOBAL economic meltdown, avoiding prosecution and getting their bonuses to boot? AND getting bailed out by taxpayers in many countries. If that’s not entitlement, I don’t know what is. Not to mention the Dairy and Meat industry subsidies, etc., etc, etc . . . – Rebecca

THE UNBRIDLED WICKEDNESS OF WHITE FOLKS

[Re: Dear Uncle Bruce, regarding diversity quotas, Feb. 4] What is it about Caucasians that makes them so evil that their numbers must be managed with diversity management systems in every given time and place? – mememine Continue Reading

Letters to the Editor

- - Everything Else
The London Yodeller

LettersEditorwebTHEY LOVE US IN HOGTOWN

Just finished my first issue (Jan. 7-20), which I thoroughly enjoyed reading. It was a treat to find such interesting articles and columns. I’m from Toronto but often visit my daughter and granddaughters in London. I’ll pick up your paper whenever I come. – Geoff Dean

ADAMICK MAKES TOO MUCH OF CRIMINAL ACTIONS OF A FEW THUGS

[Re: The End of Feminism, Dappled Things, January 10, Paula Adamick] I was stunned to read Paula Adamick’s xenophobic manifesto on “The End of Feminism”. As strange as it may sound coming from a Muslim male, I am a proud feminist. The freedoms and opportunities afforded to women completely coincide with my credo and values.

What has Islam done for the “plight of powerless Muslim women”? Not much – only to guarantee as much rights and in some cases more, than that of their male counterparts. This includes, but not exclusive to, the right to obtain property and inheritance; the right to education; the right to safety and security from all external harms and abuse. And much more.

Muslims in global unison strongly condemned the appalling acts in Germany, as we all should. But to pin the criminal actions of a few thugs on the “advance of the Islamist movement” is symptomatic of troublesome mindsets.

Perhaps Adamick should try on the Dolce and Gabbana flowing robes. It may provide the author a new perspective on the diverse ways people choose to live. – F. Al-Dhaher

ADAMICK HAS GOT ME CONFUSED

Though I‘m not sure to what purpose, in every column Paula Adamick tells us that Western civilization’s done, it’s being overrun by the barbarians while its feminized men stand haplessly by. Okay, I think we all get that, it’s pretty basic, the same old story for every civilization or empire: life gets soft, estrogen supplants testosterone, that attracts the barbarians, blah, blah, blah. But in her The End of Feminism column she confuses me. Now she says it’s not the barbarians we have to worry about, it’s Marxist “totalitarian forces” that will rule us in a way “in which the Free World ultimately disappears into a collectivist superstructure ruling over masses of people no longer capable of self-government.” Yikes! I hate it when I get confused about what to worry about. – Alex Lutz

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Letters to the Editor

- - Everything Else
The London Yodeller

LettersEditorwebDAVE CLARKE’S REVIEW OF JIMMIE MACK’S ‘LOST CLASSIC’ STRIKES A COUPLE OF CHORDS

 [Re: Lost Classic: Jimmie Mack and the Jumpers, Then Play On, Nov. 19, Dave Clarke]

I just wanted to thank you and Dave Clarke for featuring Jimmie Mack and the Jumpers as your “Lost Classic”. In 1980, as an 18 year old, I had the outrageous pleasure of being the “roadie on duty” for the recording of this album. Besides getting to meet and work with Roy Bittan who I kind of worshiped due to his connection to Bowie and Springsteen (and he let me drive his Porsche!) the Power Station recording studio was overrun with greatness. At various times during the recording of the album I got to meet and hang out with the members of Dire Straits, Meatloaf, Peter Frampton and several members of the E-Street Band. It was, without a doubt, the time of my life.
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Letters to the Editor

- - Everything Else
The London Yodeller

LettersEditorwebAN OASIS FOR THE CONTENT-THIRSTY TRAVELLER

[Re: The London Yodeller, Dec. 3 edition] Congratulations on The Yodeller. Picked up a copy at my motel on a recent trip to London, expecting to flip through it in a few minutes and then get back to a very good book I was enjoying. One hour and forty-odd minutes later I finished ‘scanning’ through The Yodeller. Packed with great articles; thought-provoking pieces and superb entertainment . . . And I couldn’t find a single grammatical error or typo anywhere. Well done. Best wishes for many more Yodellers. – David E. Scott (Former Freeps Travel Editor)

A GRATIFYING REVIEW OF VANESSA BROWN’S HOTEL LONDON HISTORY

[Re: The Grand Old Lady finally reveals her story and secrets, Book Review, Dec. 17, Herman Goodden] Glad to hear the hotel experience is shining through and people are enjoying this book. When I was working with Vanessa Brown on this book it was easy to feel transported back in time when we immersed ourselves in the stories, history and photos/ephemera. It’s really exciting to hear others are having a similar experience which lets us know The Grand Old Lady certainly won’t be forgotten. – Roxanne Lutz Continue Reading

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